Space And Stuff, IDK



Jul 14 Reblogged

ageofdestruction:

claudette: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 10 April 2008.

On the Vastitas Borealis. Believe this image runs about 660 km from 79°N 55°E to 68°N 62°E.

Composite of 3 visible light images for colour and one monochrome for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

Jul 14 Reblogged

the-goddamazon:

LFMAOOOOFMonsoan

(Source: vincentvangaylord)

Jul 11 Reblogged

lightthiscandle:


(April 1970)—-Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (right), backup crew commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, pours a scoop-full of sample material into a bag held by astronaut Joe H. Engle, Apollo 14 backup crew lunar module pilot. The two joined the prime crew members and other Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) personnel on a training trip to various areas of Hawaii. Here in Kapoho, the two backup crew members for NASA’s next lunar landing mission are taking part in a full simulation of a traverse on the lunar surface. Note the check-list on Cernan’s left wrist. He carries a penetrometer in his belt. The terrain in this area bears many similarities to that on the lunar surface. (Photo credit: NASA)

Why, hello.

*Kramers through the door*
A GOOD POST.

lightthiscandle:

(April 1970)—-Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (right), backup crew commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, pours a scoop-full of sample material into a bag held by astronaut Joe H. Engle, Apollo 14 backup crew lunar module pilot. The two joined the prime crew members and other Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) personnel on a training trip to various areas of Hawaii. Here in Kapoho, the two backup crew members for NASA’s next lunar landing mission are taking part in a full simulation of a traverse on the lunar surface. Note the check-list on Cernan’s left wrist. He carries a penetrometer in his belt. The terrain in this area bears many similarities to that on the lunar surface. (Photo credit: NASA)

Why, hello.

*Kramers through the door*

A GOOD POST.

Jul 10 Reblogged

(Source: vapor-man)

Jul 10 Reblogged

lightthiscandle:

Alan Shepard Drinks Tea Like A Boss: The Definitive Photoset

Jul 08 Reblogged

jump-suit:

lightthiscandle:


From 1962: A mannequin astronaut “is carried to a display area in David Jones’ Market Street store yesterday…The suit, which is a replica of those worn by Colonel John Glenn and Lieutenant Commander Scott Carpenter on their orbital space flights, has already been exhibited in the Far East. The wax head in the helmet is a wax sculpture of Carpenter. The space capsule used in the first orbital flight will arrive in Sydney on July 15 and will be displayed in Hyde Park.”

Raise your hand if you’re terrified

PUT HIM BACK IN THE WATER HE CANNOT SURVIVE OUT OF THE WATER

I am uncomfortable.

jump-suit:

lightthiscandle:

From 1962: A mannequin astronaut “is carried to a display area in David Jones’ Market Street store yesterday…The suit, which is a replica of those worn by Colonel John Glenn and Lieutenant Commander Scott Carpenter on their orbital space flights, has already been exhibited in the Far East. The wax head in the helmet is a wax sculpture of Carpenter. The space capsule used in the first orbital flight will arrive in Sydney on July 15 and will be displayed in Hyde Park.”

Raise your hand if you’re terrified

PUT HIM BACK IN THE WATER HE CANNOT SURVIVE OUT OF THE WATER

I am uncomfortable.

Jul 06 Reblogged

for-all-mankind:

One of Florida’s hidden gems, the Chalet Suzanne restaurant in Lake Wales, will close on August 4. Known for its lavish, Bavarian-styled decor and swiss-dressed waitresses, the restaurant has been in operation since 1931.
During the Apollo program, the frequent diner and Apollo 15 astronaut James Irwin reccomended the Chalet’s Spinach and Mushroom soup as part of their mission fare. Apollo 16’s crew also followed suit. Incredibly, Alexi Leonov and Valeri Kubasov, the Russian crew of the joint U.S.- U.S.S.R. Apollo-Soyuz Test Project chose the soup to be launched on their Soyuz Spacecraft for the mission!
Chalet Suzanne was so proud of this honor (and rightly so!) that to this day, and up until they close, they sell cans of “Moon Soup Romaine”, as seen in the image above.

for-all-mankind:

One of Florida’s hidden gems, the Chalet Suzanne restaurant in Lake Wales, will close on August 4. Known for its lavish, Bavarian-styled decor and swiss-dressed waitresses, the restaurant has been in operation since 1931.

During the Apollo program, the frequent diner and Apollo 15 astronaut James Irwin reccomended the Chalet’s Spinach and Mushroom soup as part of their mission fare. Apollo 16’s crew also followed suit. Incredibly, Alexi Leonov and Valeri Kubasov, the Russian crew of the joint U.S.- U.S.S.R. Apollo-Soyuz Test Project chose the soup to be launched on their Soyuz Spacecraft for the mission!

Chalet Suzanne was so proud of this honor (and rightly so!) that to this day, and up until they close, they sell cans of “Moon Soup Romaine”, as seen in the image above.

Jul 06 Reblogged

projecthabu:

     This magnificent F-1 rocket engine is on display in front of the Infinity Science Center in Hancock County, Mississippi. Infinity is located across the highway from NASA Stennis Space Center, where they tested these beasts during the Apollo days. Beside the enormous F-1 stands an H-1 engine, which produced eight times less thrust (shown in final photo).

     During testing, five F-1 engines, each producing 1.5 million pounds of thrust, roared to life, liquefying the ground with its acoustic shock wave surrounding the B-2 test stand at Stennis. Eventually, five of these engines would carry the Saturn V rocket (shown in a previous post, click here to view) for the first 150 seconds of its journey, guzzling fifteen tons of fuel per second. I once heard that these engines got an average fuel mileage of two inches per gallon.

     The F-1 uses an RP-1 (refined kerosene, similar to jet fuel) as its fuel, and a LOX (liquid oxygen) oxidizer. It is currently the most powerful liquid fuel rocket engine in existence. There have been more powerful solid fuel engines, and liquid fuel engine clusters.

     The engine was designed by Rocketdyne, first for the Air Force, who wanted a large engine such as this. Later, the Air Force dropped the program after a testing phase, but NASA restarted the F-1 development for use with their space program.

     Incredible problems were overcome during the development of this engine. Notably, a condition called combustion instability. During combustion instability, the gasses in the combustion chamber began to spin at an incredible two thousand cycles per second, creating hot spots in the chamber structure, which eventually cause the engine to fail catastrophically, (e.g. explode). The problem was overcome, after months of research and thousands of man hours, by redesigning the injector plate (shown in the third photo) numerous times, until the problem mostly went away.

     Amazingly, the operational life of the F-1 may live on. A team is currently firing an original F-1 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (a facility which I covered in a previous post, click here to view), familiarizing themselves with it’s characteristics, and will be modifying the design for possible use with the final evolution of the future NASA SLS rocket. This modified engine will be called the F-1B, and will produce 1.8 million pounds of thrust, which is far more than the original. I’ve covered the first first flight-ready component of the SLS booster in a previous post (click here to view).

Jul 05 Reblogged

thelegendends:

HISTORY MEME - WORLD VERSION ♛ [06/08] objects : Apollo 11’s flag

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first humans on the Moon, Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, on July 20, 1969, at 20:18 UTC. Armstrong became the first to step onto the lunar surface six hours later on July 21 at 02:56 UTC. Armstrong spent about two and a half hours outside the spacecraft, Aldrin slightly less, and together they collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material for return to Earth. The astronauts planted a specially designed U.S. flag on the lunar surface, in clear view of the TV camera. The LFA was specially designed with a horizontal pole to support the flag on the airless Moon to make it appear to fly as it would in the wind on Earth. The LFA presented a range of technical challenges, including packaging, tolerance of environmental conditions and deployment. Some Americans anticipated possible controversy over planting the United States flag on the Moon, since territorial claims to any extraterrestrial body were prohibited by the Outer Space Treaty signed by the United States, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom on January 27, 1967. But since it was made clear the United States had no intention of making a territorial claim to the Moon, no serious controversy materialized. In fact, the United States Congress passed a bill in November 1969, signed into law by President Richard M. Nixon, stating “the flag of the United States, and no other flag, shall be implanted or otherwise placed on the surface of the moon, or on the surface of any planet, by members of the crew of any spacecraft … as part of any mission … the funds for which are provided entirely by the Government of the United States. … this act is intended as a symbolic gesture of national pride in achievement and is not to be construed as a declaration of national appropriation by claim of sovereignty”. A review of photographs taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) indicates that flags placed during the Apollo 12, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17 missions were still standing as of 2012. The flag for the Apollo 11 mission was blown over by the rocket blast during lift-off. It is believed that the colors on the flags have turned white due to sunlight and space radiation. 

Jul 05 Reblogged

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